Sleeping on a Train.

Since my early 20s, I have never gotten a lot of sleep.  In my teenage years, I would routinely sleep soundly for 10 for 12 hours. My father could never understand that since he was lucky to get five or six hours sleep. In fact, I remember more than a few occasions when he would come upstairs and wake me up apparently feeling it was import for me to know that I had missed breakfast.

Strangely—at least it seems strange to me—even in my dotage, I sleep quite well on the train, assuming I have a reasonably comfortable berth and am not cold.

Be advised, however, that being cold is certainly a possibility on an Amtrak long-distance train. The most common cause is the A/C system in an older Superliner sleeping car* running amok and/or the slats in the ceiling vent refusing to close. This is why veteran Amtrak travelers carry a small roll of duct tape. It’s perfect for fixing rattles, closing down ceiling vents, and dealing with hundreds of other issues. If the problem is a simple one, your sleeping car attendant can usually rustle up a more comfortable pillow or an extra blanket.

Finally, if anyone has a copy of Terms & Conditions for the Rocky Mountaineer that were in effect in January of 2020, please contact me by posting a comment. 

Be advised, however, that being cold is certainly a possibility on an Amtrak long-distance train. The most common cause is the A/C system in an older Superliner sleeping car* running amok and/or the slats in the ceiling vent refusing to close. This is why veteran Amtrak travelers carry a small roll of duct tape. It’s perfect for fixing rattles, closing down ceiling vents, and dealing with hundreds of other issues. If the problem is a simple one, your sleeping car attendant can usually rustle up a more comfortable pillow or an extra blanket.Finally, if anyone has a copy of Terms & Conditions for the Rocky Mountaineer that were in effect in January of 2020, please contact me by posting a comment.

* “older Superliner seeping car” is a redundancy.